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March 20, 2006
The Bush Administration Has Unveiled Its "Top-to-Bottom Review" of U.S.-China Trade Policy
The review is a Bush administration attempt to address the multiplying efforts in the U.S. Congress to eliminate the perceived imbalance in bilateral trade, including a proposal to impose a 27.5% import duty on all Chinese imports. Companies involved in U.S.-China trade can expect to see more U.S. trade action, such as antidumping and import safeguard cases, as well as increased pressure on China’s enforcement of intellectual property rights. There are opportunities for companies to influence the direction of these latter efforts through involvement in Washington-based government-industry processes. More…

Growing Apprehension Over Chinese Antitrust Law
There is increasing business concern about the scope of the long-awaited Chinese antitrust law. Most recently, foreign businesses have indicated alarm over the introduction into the draft of a specific offence in relation to abuse of a dominant position through the use of intellectual property rights. More…

Many importers and manufacturers pay unnecessary duty on imported merchandise, either directly or as a cost of procured materials. Strategic importers looking for cost-saving techniques should consider various tools to reduce or eliminate tariff costs. More….



The proposed U.S. – Korea FTA will be the most commercially significant FTA the U.S. has negotiated since NAFTA. It is expected to liberalize access to the U.S. and Korea’s markets for consumer goods, services and agriculture and also impose greater protection for U.S. foreign investments and intellectual property rights. More…



Elements of India’s new patent law which took effect in 2005 have prevented Novartis from obtaining a patent for its cancer drug "Gleevec." As a result, generic versions of the drug can now enter the Indian market despite the fact that Novartis held an existing patent on a key chemical component of the drug. More…


New Indian investment rules allow foreign retailers to set up majority-owned stores in India – a high-growth market eyed by foreign retailers for years. India has also lifted investment limits and simplified procedures in other sectors, including transportation, energy, mining and manufacturing – facilitating greater market access and lowering market entry costs in India. More…



Controversial U.S. DOT proposal to attract investment in the U.S. Airlines draws fire from both sides of the pond rather than hope for Open Skies. More…



Crowell & Moring's Robert Maclean authors new practical guide on EU Trade Barrier Regulation for EU Companies More...

Doral Cooper and Brian Peck to Speak at the The California Council for International Trade (CCIT) 8th Annual Trade Policy Forum More...


NAFTA provisions on "regional value content" (RVC) calculation causes serious problems for related parties. In order to qualify as “originating goods” under NAFTA, products manufactured in NAFTA countries using non-NAFTA inputs frequently must satisfy a RVC requirement. More…



The Office of Foreign Assets Control ("OFAC") of the U.S. Department of the Treasury has issued an interim final rule outlining a new set of enforcement procedures. Although applicable only to banking institutions, these procedures provide a first glimpse into the enforcement schematic that OFAC is likely to apply to other industries in the future. More…



The Miscellaneous Tariff Bill (MTB) may be more relevant to your business than it sounds - at least if you are an importer of products that American factories do not produce domestically. More…


EU to reintroduce FSC duties on US imports
The European Union announced its intention to re-introduce additional customs duties on imported products from the United States after the WTO Appellate Body’s decision that the United States failed to comply with its earlier rulings in the Foreign Sales Corporation dispute. In mid-May this year, EU importers will face additional duties of up to 14% on a wide range of products made in the United States. More…

New Proposed EU Rules of Origin Will Impact on Sourcing in the Global Market Place
Businesses with operations in countries benefiting from tariff preferences are often unable to make the most effective use of these preferences due to unfavorable rules of origin. For example, a textile factory in Zimbabwe is currently often unable to source fabric from South Africa without loosing its preferences. Even more so, a chemical processing plant in Bolivia is prevented from cumulating origin when obtaining phosphor from China. In the interest of developing countries, recent measures by the EU and the U.S. are trying to address this issue. More…

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